steve By Steven Yeung, M.S..

Sridhar Radhakrishnan, Steven F Yeung, Jia-Yu Ke, Maísa M Antunes, Michael A Pellizzon
Current Developments in Nutrition, Volume 5, Issue 12, December 2021

ABSTRACT

Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is intricately linked to metabolic disease (including obesity, glucose intolerance, and insulin resistance) and encompasses a spectrum of disorders including steatosis, nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), and fibrosis. Rodents consuming high-fat (HF; ∼40 kcal% fat including fats containing higher concentrations of saturated and trans fats), high-fructose (HFr), and high-cholesterol (HC) diets display many clinically relevant characteristics of NASH, along with other metabolic disorders. C57BL/6 mice are the most commonly used animal model because they can develop significant metabolic disorders including severe NASH with fibrosis after months of feeding, but other models also are susceptible. The significant number of diets that contain these different factors (i.e., HF, HFr, and HC), either alone or in combination, makes the choice of diet difficult. This methodology review describes the efficacy of these nutrient manipulations on the NAFLD phenotype in mice, rats, guinea pigs, hamsters, and nonhuman primates. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is intricately linked to metabolic disease (including obesity, glucose intolerance, and insulin resistance) and encompasses a spectrum of disorders including steatosis, nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), and fibrosis. Rodents consuming high-fat (HF; ∼40 kcal% fat including fats containing higher concentrations of saturated and trans fats), high-fructose (HFr), and high-cholesterol (HC) diets display many clinically relevant characteristics of NASH, along with other metabolic disorders. C57BL/6 mice are the most commonly used animal model because they can develop significant metabolic disorders including severe NASH with fibrosis after months of feeding, but other models also are susceptible. The significant number of diets that contain these different factors (i.e., HF, HFr, and HC), either alone or in combination, makes the choice of diet difficult. This methodology review describes the efficacy of these nutrient manipulations on the NAFLD phenotype in mice, rats, guinea pigs, hamsters, and nonhuman primates.

REFERENCE:

Sridhar Radhakrishnan, Steven F Yeung, Jia-Yu Ke, Maísa M Antunes, Michael A Pellizzon, Considerations When Choosing High-Fat, High-Fructose, and High-Cholesterol Diets to Induce Experimental Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease in Laboratory Animal Models, Current Developments in Nutrition, Volume 5, Issue 12, December 2021, nzab138, https://doi.org/10.1093/cdn/nzab138